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Drip Pan(s)

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tkhersom
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Location: Edgecomb, Maine

Drip Pan(s)

Post by tkhersom » Mon Nov 11, 2013 1:13 pm

When I purchased "American Beauty" one of the things the surveyor pointed out was that there where no drip pans under the engines.

I did not see this as an issue since I have never had a boat with a drip pan. :?

Is this specific to Cruisers?

I am pulling the engines this winter, so if I am going to install pans this would be the time to do it.

Should I install them? If so why? If not why not?

I would not think that I would want to lay them flat on the bilge do to lack of air circulation.

If I install them should they be suspended between the stringers?
Troy in ANE - Former President CCABC

1957 CC 21' Continental "Yorktown" (Mom's boat)
https://www.chris-craft.org/boats/22625/
1958 CC 38' Connie "American Beauty"
https://www.chris-craft.org/boats/22607/
1985 Formula 242LS "Gottago"
1991 Formula 36PC "Band Aids"

Life Is Too Short To Own An Ugly Boat

Peter M Jardine
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Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 10:27 am

Re: Drip Pan(s)

Post by Peter M Jardine » Mon Nov 11, 2013 8:32 pm

Yes, you should install them, and yep between the stringers, hanging. you can make a template out of either thin ply, or even corrugated cardboard. A good sheet metal guy can make them and then weld on some arms to secure them to the stringers. One of the questions is whether the transmissions are part of the pan, which then becomes more complicated. I just have pans under the engine, extending under the bell housing. I did mine in aluminum, but stainless may be more suitable for salt water folks.

There are ways to make engines that don't leak, but it's a lot of work blueprinting surfaces, so most of us face the fact that with the vibration of a marine engine, leaks do develop over time. Hell, on the old Detroit 71 series, and the 453's that were in the big Connies and the Commanders, you quickly got used to the idea of only going halfway up the dipstick since the rest of it would end up in the bilge. Those engines needed drip barrels, not pans. :mrgreen:

Bottom line is that with a 1 inch lip or so you can put a bilge blanket in thhe pans and keep the oil from mixing with bilge water and being pumped out into the lake. That by itself is worth it.

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tkhersom
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Joined: Wed Feb 27, 2013 6:56 pm
Location: Edgecomb, Maine

Re: Drip Pan(s)

Post by tkhersom » Mon Nov 11, 2013 8:41 pm

Thanks Peter:

I am talking WBR Herc's so I am pretty sure the oil is shared with the transmission. :roll:
Troy in ANE - Former President CCABC

1957 CC 21' Continental "Yorktown" (Mom's boat)
https://www.chris-craft.org/boats/22625/
1958 CC 38' Connie "American Beauty"
https://www.chris-craft.org/boats/22607/
1985 Formula 242LS "Gottago"
1991 Formula 36PC "Band Aids"

Life Is Too Short To Own An Ugly Boat

Peter M Jardine
Posts: 697
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 10:27 am

Re: Drip Pan(s)

Post by Peter M Jardine » Tue Nov 12, 2013 3:57 pm

Then you should probably include the transmission on the pan length. For the most part on the CC cruisers, there is enough space underneath the engine to just lengthen the whole pan, but you can consider making the back tranny portion a little narrower, and even with a separate set of walls. The separation allows for a pan that is staggered in height if you need to do that to get under the transmission. Mocking one up while the engine is in place, or at least getting the measurements all recorded, is a must.

farupp
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Location: Charleston, SC
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Re: Drip Pan(s)

Post by farupp » Tue Nov 12, 2013 5:37 pm

My 1949 27 foot enclosed cruiser had a drip pan only under the carburetor. It was invaluable. I had no leaks from the oil pan or transmission. But the one under the carburetor was very important as occasionally the float would stick open. The pan collected the gas instead of it draining to the bilge.
Frank Rupp
1959 22-foot Sea Skiff Ranger
283 Flywheel Forward engine

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