Active Active   Unanswered Unanswered

From Archive: Rudder 1976 CC 25 ft. by Carol Ann

Bronze, stainless, chrome or steel. If you need information about the non-wood items on your Chris-Craft, pose your questions here.

Moderators: Al Benton, Don Ayers, Don Vogt

Club Archivist
Site Admin
Posts: 164
Joined: Fri Nov 11, 2005 9:15 am
Location: Club Headquarters
Contact:

From Archive: Rudder 1976 CC 25 ft. by Carol Ann

Post by Club Archivist » Mon Nov 14, 2005 11:18 pm

hope everybody,had a good thanksgiving. i'm having a problem with water coming thru the hull. i replaced,the thru hull bolts on the strut,replaced the drain plug fitting. all that is left is the rudder. is there  packing in the shaft..what keeps,the shaft,water tight?? thank you for any help.

carol ann
Last edited by Club Archivist on Mon Nov 14, 2005 11:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Posted by Club Archivist
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This topic was reposted from Memberclicks archive
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Club Archivist
Site Admin
Posts: 164
Joined: Fri Nov 11, 2005 9:15 am
Location: Club Headquarters
Contact:

From Archive: Rudder 1976 CC 25 ft. by Scott Jacobson

Post by Club Archivist » Mon Nov 14, 2005 11:20 pm

Carol Ann,
 
Both the shaft and the rudder each have a "stuffing" box where they enter the boat and each is filled with what is called "flax packing".  This looks like a small piece of rope impregnated with wax.  The first and most simple thing to try to stop them from leaking, if they are the problem, is to tighten down the big nut by a half turn.  You want to be careful about overtightening because the packing is lubricated with water and if they are overtightened, they can overheat while underway and heat or score the shaft.  If it's tightened right, while underway it should drip very slowly, I forgot how many drips per minute etc.. is the normal but it must drip.  At rest, it shouldn't drip at all.
 
If you try to tighten it and that doesn't work, then it probably needs to be replaced.  Do you know when it was replaced last?  It's common to have them re-packed every year or two, depending on use.  I've always had the boat hauled out of the water for this job to be done.  I have heard that some people have done it while still in the water, but I just don't feel comfortable opening up something in the bottom of the boat that allows water to come in that doesn't have a valve on it that I can shut off.  To replace the packing, one loosens the tightening nut on the top of the stuffing box and slides it up the shaft.  Then all of the old packing material must be removed.  Replacement packing material can usually be found at marine supply stores.  When installing the new packing, it should be wound around the shaft in the direction that the shaft rotates, i.e. so that when the shaft is rotating, the rotation causes the packing to stay tight, rather than loosen it up.  For the rudder stuffing box, I don't know that it makes a difference which way it is wound. Once the sutffing box is filled, then replace and retighten the stuffing box nut, but don't overtighten as mentioned above.
 
Good luck,
 
Scott
Posted by Club Archivist
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This topic was reposted from Memberclicks archive
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

tgfinn
Posts: 14
Joined: Thu Oct 27, 2005 5:11 am
Location: akron/richmond/daytona
Contact:

Post by tgfinn » Tue Nov 15, 2005 5:56 am

dont forget when cutting the flax to cut at a
45 degree angle so it fits tight
tim finnerty
1960 ski boat

Club Archivist
Site Admin
Posts: 164
Joined: Fri Nov 11, 2005 9:15 am
Location: Club Headquarters
Contact:

From Archive: Rudder 1976 CC 25 ft. by Bill Large

Post by Club Archivist » Tue Nov 15, 2005 9:29 am

Let me add some things to Scott's reply to your question about the rudder stuffing box. 
 
You are going to need a very large wrench to loosen the nut on the stuffing box.  Borrow a large adjustable pipe wrench.  Once the nut breaks free, it will be easy to unscrew and slide up the rudder post.  Don't disconnect the steering arm from the rudder post.
 
The packing is usually sold by the foot and there are many widths.  Choose one that is the approximate width of the old material that you pull out.  You might have to improvise a tool with a hook on the end so you can pull out all of the old packing material.  You want to get it all.
 
Lay the new packing material in around the rudder shaft so that it makes one complete turn.  Then add a second length, being careful to position it so that seam in the first ring of packing doesn't align with the seam in the second.  You'll probably end up with three rings of packing material.  If you put in one ring too many, you won't be able to catch the first few threads on the packing nut.
 
When you are finished installing the packing material, tighten the large packing nut hand tight plus one turn.  If it leaks between the packing nut and the stuffing box when you put it back in the water, simply tighten it another turn or until it drips a drop or two every few minutes when you are underway.  If you tighten the packing nut too much, the boat will be noticeably harder to steer.
 
One other thought on your leak.  A common source of leaks in that area is the fairing block between the stuffing box and the inside of the hull.  You mention that your Chris Craft is 1976, so it is made of fiberglass.  Look at what is in between the stuffing box and the inside of the hull.  If it is wood and if that wood appears flaky, that's where the leak is coming from.  The fairing block between the hull and the stuffing box is subject to electrolysis.  If the wood appears flaky and soft, you'll need to remove the entire stuffing box and rudder and install an new fairing block.  The stuffing box should be bonded with a length of #12 wire to the engine.
 
Hope this helps,
 
Bill
Posted by Club Archivist
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This topic was reposted from Memberclicks archive
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests