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Posted from Archive, Message by Kipboats: Blonde Decking

One part science, five parts experimentation. Every wood boat veteran has their secret recipe for a showy finish. Share your trials and triumphs.

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Posted from Archive, Message by Kipboats: Blonde Decking

Post by Club Archivist » Thu Dec 29, 2005 1:09 am

Can anyone tell me what they use for stain on the blond decking on a Riviera.

Thanks

Kip
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Posted from Archive, Message by Tom Lang: Blonde Decking

Post by Club Archivist » Thu Dec 29, 2005 1:10 am

It is a natural stain (i.e. no real color in it), simply a nearly colorless filler stain. As you probably know the mahogany is bleached before applying this stain. I'm not sure it is made anymore, I used to have a can of it lying around, possibly can find it if you need it.

We recently restored two Rivieras and used avodire mahogany (naturally light colored) and used no stain whatsover for replacement blonde decking. This is the same wood Century used for their blonde decks. Chris Craft bleached the phillipine mahogany. Avodire has much more detail and character. So if you have to replace the blonde, consider it, but it is hard to find.

Tom Lang
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Posted from Archive, Message by Steve Smith: Blonde Decking

Post by Club Archivist » Thu Dec 29, 2005 1:13 am

Speaking of Avodire....I had a customer who made a deck of avodire and Honduras mahogany glued together to get contrasting colors in one wood structure.

It turns out the coefficients of expansion of those two woods with temperature and humidity are different [and he may have cut one wood more plainsawn and the other quartersawn, just to add to the ways one can get unexpected results], and when my Five Year Clear went on top, there was differential shrinkage in the woods that showed up a up-and-down steps visible in the high gloss of the finish where it went from one wood to another.

If anyone contemplates this sort of construction, I would recommend a *shallow* inlay of one wood in kerfs cut in the second wood. also, cut both woods so the angle of the grain is similar. The visual effect will be identical but you will entirely avoid seeing steps in the finish that come and go with temperature and humidity variations in the weather.

Steve
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