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Porthole trim

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StValentine
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Porthole trim

Post by StValentine » Tue Mar 29, 2016 9:41 pm

I've had to replace some wood around the outside portholes on my 1968 57' Connie. I needed to remove the metal trim and it got pretty beat up in the process. Anyone know where to get new trim or how to fabricate it? I also have one of the round pieces of trim on the round portholes in the engine room that got chewed up against the dock. I've been looking for 7-inch stainless steel rings to replace on all those with no luck. Any pointers would be appreciated.

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tkhersom
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Location: Edgecomb, Maine
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Re: Porthole trim

Post by tkhersom » Wed Mar 30, 2016 7:50 am

I sound like a broken record here, but I would check with Jim Staib first. http://www.finewoodboats.com

Also John Hundley has been clearing out his families business. I don't know how to reach him other than Face Book.

Good Luck! :D
Troy in ANE - Former President CCABC

1957 CC 21' Continental "Yorktown" (Mom's boat)
https://www.chris-craft.org/boats/22625/
1958 CC 38' Connie "American Beauty"
https://www.chris-craft.org/boats/22607/
1985 Formula 242LS "Gottago"
1991 Formula 36PC "Band Aids"

Life Is Too Short To Own An Ugly Boat


StValentine
Posts: 61
Joined: Sat Jun 27, 2009 9:16 pm
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Re: Porthole trim

Post by StValentine » Sat Apr 02, 2016 10:26 pm

Jim Staib didn't have it but, as fate would have it, I found something better. A boat across from mine was having its bottom cleaned by a professional diver. I happened to be working on my boat and the diver and I struck up a conversation. Then I remembered the lost piece of trim and told him about it. Before he started on the other boat, he jumped in and found my lost piece of trim. Shout out to J.R. Robison of Sub Surface Dive Services. Sometimes it's better to be lucky than good.

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tkhersom
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Location: Edgecomb, Maine
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Re: Porthole trim

Post by tkhersom » Sun Apr 03, 2016 6:46 am

StValentine wrote:Jim Staib didn't have it but, as fate would have it, I found something better. A boat across from mine was having its bottom cleaned by a professional diver. I happened to be working on my boat and the diver and I struck up a conversation. Then I remembered the lost piece of trim and told him about it. Before he started on the other boat, he jumped in and found my lost piece of trim. Shout out to J.R. Robison of Sub Surface Dive Services. Sometimes it's better to be lucky than good.
NICE! :mrgreen:

Thanks for the follow up. I LOVE a happy ending!
Troy in ANE - Former President CCABC

1957 CC 21' Continental "Yorktown" (Mom's boat)
https://www.chris-craft.org/boats/22625/
1958 CC 38' Connie "American Beauty"
https://www.chris-craft.org/boats/22607/
1985 Formula 242LS "Gottago"
1991 Formula 36PC "Band Aids"

Life Is Too Short To Own An Ugly Boat

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Corsair
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Re: Porthole trim

Post by Corsair » Wed Apr 06, 2016 5:24 pm

Check your area for metal shapers. There are usually shops near where airplanes are restored. They have the tools and skills to make all kinds of odd shapes. I have some car parts reproduced near here, and the quality and fit is excellent.

keith colonna
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Location: Norfolk, Virginia
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Re: Porthole trim

Post by keith colonna » Wed Apr 06, 2016 9:33 pm

it's important to keep the look the designers had and keep this trim ring. It creates a shadow line in builder's terms and defines the port lights. Originally CC used copper/brass because it was soft and easy to bend creating the beaded edge and then the compound curves around the oblong port lights. Then it was chrome plated for durability, but age and salt water usually causes these to fail in short order. I have considered replacing mine with stainless steel, but haven't found a metal smith confident to make those bends. I am sure though that someone can do it..with a thinner gauge SS. The advantage of SS is that it can be polished repeatedly, whereas the rechromed copper originals of mine have failed and chrome has broken off. BTW, I removed mine and the small original spiral nails with a special tool for prying tacks which I bought at an upholstery supply shop.I replaced them with SS sheet metal round head screws....#4's x 1/2-3/4" , I think. The inside of the portlight was originally copper. I left mine in place and after many experiments in treatments.....I found that sanding to clean metal and applying POR 15 has kept them and the overcoat of satin white paint intact for over 5 years.

gbmacca
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Re: snken connie

Post by gbmacca » Tue Apr 12, 2016 10:51 pm

WARNING TO OLDER BOAT OWNERS!!

Hi,

I bought a lovely 55' Chris Craft Constellation in Seattle and shipped it home to my home town of Perth in Australia. That is a story in itself.

After three years of doing upgrades, attending to areas of beautification and in general just improving the overall condition of the boat to suit our quite harsh climate, sadly she sunk last month.

Started boat and went around to our club's fuel jetty and once there, after the engines were turned off, noted that the forward bilge pump at the lowest point, was constantly on. On inspecting the boat I thought that a plank had split in the starboard aft area but when I dived on her - found no damage.

By this time the exhaust outlet was below the water level and my three bilge pumps were unable to handle the inflow of water.

We had blown a hole in the cast iron muffler! The 82 year old salvage boss said that six out of ten old boats that he 'pulled out of the drink' suffered from exhaust or muffler problems. A fact that i had never heard.

My insurance company now refuses to pay out citing "deterioration" and "fair wear and tear" as the cause to the sinking.

On removing the cupboard six months ago I checked the exhaust as best as I could and had thought it to be in excellent condition. However, when we removed the whole exhaust surround we noted that the muffler simply sat on a cross piece of timber - with no protective packing - and was held down by two metal straps. It therefore would have vibrated on that piece of timber for over 50 years.

When we started the Detroit 8v71's, as we know they are like blowing a trumpet to start with, it ruptured the muffler and caused the damage. It will take roughly $150.000 to recondition motors and replace electrics.

Has anyone else had this problem and if so - how did they tackle the insurance company for what I would hope to be a successful outcome.

We are tentatively going back to them stating that where the muffler sat, was a "latent design fault" - that the motors when started, caused an "explosion" which blew the muffler causing "consequential damage" and most importantly of all, when accepting my premium payment, knowing full well the age of the boat, and I am sure after 30 years in the boating insurance business, they would have had similar claims, that they at no time asked for inspections/surveys etc to be done as they would have known full well they would not have to pay out on the likely event of an accident happening.

They therefore did not extend to me a policy with a 'duty of care'.

Any advice or information would be gratefully received.

So all boat owners beware the age of your vessel!

Graeme McLennan
Perth Australia

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