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How much steam?

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parroteyes
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How much steam?

Post by parroteyes » Mon Oct 10, 2011 11:47 am

I am building my steam set up for chines and planks for my 16' boat.

I have a steam box, 17' 6" X 10" X 10"

I have a steam source with a 2000 w. water heater element.

I understand that there are many variables for how efficient the set-up is (leaks, insulation, etc.)

None the less, I need to know whether 2000 w of heat input is likely to be sufficient to maintain the heat in the box.

I can built a second 2000 w steam generator if necessary.

What is your experience?

Thanks for your help.


John
Hull # 16-R-OX2 (March 1946)
Engine 1B #26564

That's me 1950 - already a CC lover!

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bjornbakken
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Post by bjornbakken » Fri Oct 14, 2011 5:46 pm

I've found that using aluminum "bubble wrap" insulation works very well. Not much dead air to heat up. I used the 12" wide, folded over and staple together. And I did the steaming in two passes on the chines for my 17' Deluxe.

I placed the chine on the boat, clamped to the two center frame knees, and steam the forward section first.

I use a 2500W steamer. Use a meat thermometer to check that you're getting 110-112F.

Bjorn B.

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1940 17' Chris Craft Deluxe
1958 Riva Florida No. 319
1955 Riva Ariston

cenger
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Post by cenger » Fri Oct 14, 2011 6:44 pm

I use a similar set up to Bjorn with Frost King insulation you buy in Home Depot to wrap heating ducts. This allows you to bend the boards right in place.
1935 Gar Wood 16-35
1929 Gar Wood 28-30

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parroteyes
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Post by parroteyes » Fri Oct 14, 2011 7:01 pm

Well that really is "special"

I like the idea of eliminating the steam box for the chines Especially since at the rate I am going it is going to be cold outside by the time I get to steaming. So I'll close the garage door, turn it in to a sauna and fit chines while sweating. Wonderful thought for late November.

My combo soaking box/steam box may have gotten a demotion to just a soaker.

Have you used the "no box" set up for bottom planks?
Hull # 16-R-OX2 (March 1946)
Engine 1B #26564

That's me 1950 - already a CC lover!

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mbigpops
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Post by mbigpops » Fri Oct 14, 2011 7:47 pm

I have and it worked just as well. I used two different lengths for shorter fore planks and longer aft planks.

Have your clamps and wet towels ready to get the planks in place fast and stop them from drying out too fast.

Mark

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Post by cenger » Sat Oct 15, 2011 8:18 pm

I have used the insulation technique for the bottom planks but what works even better is a steam iron. I was skeptical at first but have found that for bottom planks a steam iron is the fastest and easiest way. Soak the planks for a day or so first then place a wet towel on top of the board add iron and viola, a ½ plank will bend to shape almost instantly.
1935 Gar Wood 16-35
1929 Gar Wood 28-30

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Kerry Price
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Post by Kerry Price » Sun Oct 16, 2011 6:59 pm

You should take a video of that iron technique and post it. Sounds pretty neat but I'm not totally sold on the idea. Seems that even with lots of steam coming out the iron that it still would be only taking the heat from one side. I'm trying to see how this method could be as effective as cooking the wood at 212 degrees at 1 hour per inch. Even then you need to work pretty fast, like 30 seconds to a minute of working time maximum on an 8' long board with lots of twists and turns and these are only 1/2" thick. Bending chines cut out of 1-1/2" mahogany or White Oak takes even longer to cook.
Still, it sounds pretty cool.
1946 20' Custom Runabout: R-20-092
1938 19' Sportsman: 19501
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Trick414
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Post by Trick414 » Sun Oct 16, 2011 7:23 pm

Kerry Price wrote:You should take a video of that iron technique and post it. Sounds pretty neat but I'm not totally sold on the idea. Seems that even with lots of steam coming out the iron that it still would be only taking the heat from one side. I'm trying to see how this method could be as effective as cooking the wood at 212 degrees at 1 hour per inch. Even then you need to work pretty fast, like 30 seconds to a minute of working time maximum on an 8' long board with lots of twists and turns and these are only 1/2" thick. Bending chines cut out of 1-1/2" mahogany or White Oak takes even longer to cook.
Still, it sounds pretty cool.
I'd love to see a video as well.

But, I will say it seems probable.

Over this last year while I restored my boat, my buddy was building a 14 foot runabout from Glen-L plans.

Mostly it was straightforward, but the chines at the bow were pretty radical. He soaked them for a day, and then used hot towels to bend them in place.

I can't say that it's even in the same ballpark as some of our boats, but I can say that I was amazed at how much they bent. Prior to being soaked and wrapped, there wasn't much bend. After, they were still tough but they sure bent in. I still can't believe they didn't blow up on us with the force we were using to get them in.

He was using African Mahogany if that makes any difference.

My best guess is that steaming them makes them extremely pliable for 30 seconds or so. But simply soaking them and getting them able to bend is 80% of the battle? I don't know, just guessing from what I saw.
Last edited by Trick414 on Sun Oct 16, 2011 7:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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cenger
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Post by cenger » Sun Oct 16, 2011 7:24 pm

I was skeptical myself. Someone gave me a video and told me to watch it. It sat on my shelf for 3yrs because I thought it would never work. In desperation I decided to watch it, gave it a try, and was amazed at how easily it bent the plank into the shape of the hull; especially at the forward curve. I'll see if I can get from VHS format to DVD so I can post it. You will be amazed.
1935 Gar Wood 16-35
1929 Gar Wood 28-30

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bjornbakken
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Post by bjornbakken » Thu Oct 20, 2011 7:54 pm

I would love to see that video. Bottom planking is next on my project.

Bjorn B.
1940 17' Chris Craft Deluxe
1958 Riva Florida No. 319
1955 Riva Ariston

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