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Wet Foam

If it doesn't pertain to metal, fiberglass, wire or fabric—but it is about classic fiberglass Chris-Crafts, ask your question or give your advice here.

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ahills
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Oct 25, 2016 8:54 pm

Wet Foam

Post by ahills » Tue Oct 25, 2016 9:03 pm

I have a 1974 Dory that has a pretty bad list to starboard (about 2"). A moisture meter indicates a lot of wetness in the bottom and a little on the sides so I suspect the foam is saturated. Has anyone dealt with this problem? I'm hoping there is a way to mitigate this without cutting up decks etc. Thanks, Alan

joanroy
Posts: 686
Joined: Sun Jan 29, 2012 1:46 pm

Re: Wet Foam

Post by joanroy » Wed Oct 26, 2016 5:41 am

This is a common problem with older glass open cockpit boats. Over time, decks crack, bedding around penetrations fails and rain water finds its way in and can't dry out. Foam becomes saturated and wooden deck framing rots. The only way I know of to fix is to cut out the deck and repair whatever underneath making sure your new deck is watertight. The good news is the glassed hulls usually don't go bad, but the extra water weight can make the boat unsafe and the problem should be addressed. Don't know if your boat has any access hatches to see what's going on under the deck. If not, you could cut out a small area and take a look. Always a good idea to research how the boat was originally constructed before you get into it. Good luck!

ahills
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Oct 25, 2016 8:54 pm

Re: Wet Foam

Post by ahills » Wed Oct 26, 2016 6:20 am

Thanks for the reply. The added weight of this is causing the cockpit to be so low that it allows water to enter if I unplug the scuppers when the boat is at rest. Gotta do something this winter!

jim g
Posts: 993
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2011 10:55 pm

Re: Wet Foam

Post by jim g » Fri Oct 28, 2016 5:58 am

Boats dating from around 1976/1977 and earlier. The manufacturers were using open cell foam. After that date they started using closed cell foam. Which doesn't absorb water. The only cure is to take it out.

At that point you can either leave it out or replace it. You can get new closed cell foam and it come in a 2 part system. When you mix it together it reacts creating an expanding foam.

As far as getting it out you might want to look at pulling the whole inner tub out instead of cutting it open to fix.

jim g
Posts: 993
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2011 10:55 pm

Re: Wet Foam

Post by jim g » Fri Oct 28, 2016 5:59 am

If you want to do another hull.I have a unique Chris Craft 22' dory that I would like to sell. It also does not have the foam in it.

ahills
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Oct 25, 2016 8:54 pm

Re: Wet Foam

Post by ahills » Fri Oct 28, 2016 2:51 pm

Thanks Jim (I think!). I kinda thought those were my options. I wasn't sure if the foam was structural or for floatation; if it can be left out, it sounds like it was more for floatation. I'm now wondering about pulling the whole tub.....would the foam be sort of gluing the hull and the tub together? It would probably take a lot of helpers at any rate. I appreciate the advice!

Alan

jim g
Posts: 993
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2011 10:55 pm

Re: Wet Foam

Post by jim g » Fri Oct 28, 2016 4:10 pm

Coast Guard required boats under 22 feet the float a surface level if swamped. That why it hit or miss on flotation in 22 footers. Heres a picture of the one I would like to sell.

All the wood is factory. The swim platform was an option. They only built 12 of this model. Outside hull is the same. Inside tub is different and they put the fuel tank under the floor in front of the engine.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

ahills
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Oct 25, 2016 8:54 pm

Re: Wet Foam

Post by ahills » Fri Oct 28, 2016 7:49 pm

Nice layout. I also like the swim platform/spray rails arrangement and the full length covering boards.

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