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New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

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Stovebolt
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New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by Stovebolt » Wed Aug 19, 2015 11:53 am

Hey folks!

I am losing some sleep over this question. I'm getting a new trailer made. 17' CC Ski Boat. An everything is straight forward, except, do I want single or dual axles. I have heard some good, and bad about going from a single to a dual axle trailer. But I figured I'd post the question here.

So, in your experience, what would you do? Single or dual? Pros and cons?

Thanks, I look forward to seeing all your input!!

T.
1961 Chris Craft 17' Ski Boat
1973 15.6' Hourston Glasscraft

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Doug P
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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by Doug P » Wed Aug 19, 2015 12:43 pm

There has much been written about trailers and trailer safety on this site. People will spend big bucks for their vessels but go cheap on their trailers. Go safe...or don't go.

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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by farupp » Wed Aug 19, 2015 1:19 pm

Dual axle.
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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by boat_art » Wed Aug 19, 2015 5:31 pm

I've experienced blowouts at highway speed with both single and dual. Trust me, you want a dual if you do any distance hauling at all.
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1956 CC Connie 47'
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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by mfine » Wed Aug 19, 2015 10:13 pm

It isn't just the number of axels. You also have to consider how close you are to Paul Harrison, and if there is any chance he may tow it for you. If I were in your shoes, I would go double axel and carry a spare!

One concern is your boat is light, so you want two lighter weight suspensions so you don't make it too stiff and shake the wood apart.

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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by Doug P » Wed Aug 19, 2015 10:40 pm

mfine wrote:It isn't just the number of axels. You also have to consider how close you are to Paul Harrison, and if there is any chance he may tow it for you. If I were in your shoes, I would go double axel and carry a spare!

One concern is your boat is light, so you want two lighter weight suspensions so you don't make it too stiff and shake the wood apart.


Unfortunately he is not that far away.

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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by tkhersom » Thu Aug 20, 2015 6:51 am

I like tandem (dual axle) trailers for most cases. :D

That being said, if all you are going to do is go short distances to and from a launch ramp a couple of times a year than there is no real need for multiple axles for a smaller boat.

IMHO it is more about how you are going to use it and we don't know that, so we are basing our answers on how we would use it.
Troy in ANE - Former President CCABC

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drrot
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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by drrot » Thu Aug 20, 2015 7:03 am

Take in to consideration your boat weigh about 2000 pounds. The lightest generally available axle is 3500 pounds. If you go with two of those your boat will have an awful stiff ride.
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1947 Penn Yan 12' Cartopper WXH474611
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1957 Chris-Craft 26' Sea Skiff SK-26-515
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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by mfine » Thu Aug 20, 2015 7:38 am

You can get 2200, 2000, and 1200 lb axels and axel-less spindle systems. You can actually have overly strong axels, it is the springs/suspension that needs to be lighter.

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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by tuobanur » Thu Aug 20, 2015 8:38 am

I opted for a dual axle, bought mind used for a very good price and I know it was originally for a boat twice the weight of my boat. It has the torx axles and it couldn't ride or pull any better,, plus the dual axles look cooler... ;)
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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by boat_art » Thu Aug 20, 2015 11:03 am

Great choice...and a great name for a Chris Craft woodie trailer "Float on". Let that be a reminder, never "pull" it on, always float it on.
http://www.boatartgallery.com
1956 CC Connie 47'
1959 Caulkins bartender
1965 Cheoy Lee Frisco Flyer
1953 Chris Craft Holiday
1941 Chris Craft Deluxe
Plus 8-12 customer boats at any time
God don't count the days spent messing around in wood boats.

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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by Doug P » Thu Aug 20, 2015 12:34 pm

Here is the original "float on". A patented cradle trailer especially made for CC Customs. The trailer would lower under the boat and then be raised hydraulically. Note the hydraulic pistons, wheel "shocks" and the lack of any winching devices.
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Stovebolt
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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by Stovebolt » Thu Aug 20, 2015 1:15 pm

Thanks for the input everyone!

I mostly tow it too and from a couple of local lakes here. About 25 to 45 mins away, depending on which one I go to. But I do travel 3 or 4 times a year over 3 hours from my house. Which is why the conundrum.

As I do more investigating on trailers and stuff, I'm going to remember to ensure that the trailer is not to stiff. I never even thought of that aspect of it. I know the local shop I was talking to suggested to go dual and axleless. He said towing would be effortless with that set up. But I'm going to mention the ride comfort to him for sure.

And Paul isn't towing it, however one if the long 4 hour trip IS to his place, but good luck has always been on my side when I go there.
1961 Chris Craft 17' Ski Boat
1973 15.6' Hourston Glasscraft

Greg Wallace
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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by Greg Wallace » Fri Aug 21, 2015 8:25 am

Given the size and weight of your boat you should be able to get along fine with either a single or tandem. If cost is not a significant factor I tend to lean towards the tandem.

As mentioned before the spring rates should be sized to the load and not necessarily the axle capacity.

Torsion axles are great but keep in mind that in a tandem application the load will only be distributed evenly between the two if the rig is level when towed otherwise one set will be loaded heavier than the other. This also comes into play when traversing incline breaks such as encountered on a ramp or curb when the plane changes abruptly. At this point one axle may be carrying the entire load. This is not a factor, however, in a traditional leaf spring set up.

Ideally, you want a stiff frame and a properly rated suspension. In modern applications for fiberglass boats the boat becomes a stressed member of the package when the bow is drawn into the bow stop. This is why a frame may be "flexible" when unloaded but not so much with the boat on.

This is not the best situation for a wood boat, especially one that retains the original "live" construction. I like a frame that is sized to remain rigid and will support the boat with minimum flexing. A four inch frame (for example) would be fine for a glass boat but may be too flexible for a woody. We would normally upsize to the next frame size or add a truss for improved rigidity.

This adds cost and weight for sure, but alleviates the stress and movement that might loosen things up otherwise.

This is less of a factor on shorter boats but becomes more so as length increases and more of the craft extends beyond the support beneath the axles.
Greg Wallace 23 Custom 22166 former Chris-Craft dealer Russells Point, Oh.

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Doug P
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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by Doug P » Fri Aug 21, 2015 8:30 am

Good explanation Greg. :)

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Doug P
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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by Doug P » Sat Aug 22, 2015 11:20 pm

Stovebolt wrote:Thanks for the input everyone!

I mostly tow it too and from a couple of local lakes here. About 25 to 45 mins away, depending on which one I go to. But I do travel 3 or 4 times a year over 3 hours from my house. Which is why the conundrum.


90% of accidents happen within 40 miles of your home (which Lake 40 miles away?...Whatcom?) :)

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Jim Godlewski
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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by Jim Godlewski » Sat Aug 29, 2015 7:15 am

We have a single axle for our 17 foot and it seems to be perfect. 800 mile trips are no problem. Dual axle is overkill for this size boat IMO. Keep your tires in perfect condition and you will be fine. Make sure you get the reverse lockout solenoid.
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Don Vogt
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Re: New Trailer. Single or Dual Axle??

Post by Don Vogt » Sat Aug 29, 2015 8:37 am

Stovebolt, one of the advantages of a single axle is that you can maneuver it around by hand which is hard to do with a dual axle. ours works fine for a 17' boat. Less expensive, too.

One of the best custom trailers around is the Ryan made here in the NW in Oregon. A top choice, imho. Ask Paul H. , I f I recall, he has them under a couple of his boats too?
1938 Chris Craft 17' Deluxe Runabout "Jennifer II"

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