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How many people can I have on my boat?

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debiby
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How many people can I have on my boat?

Post by debiby » Sat Jul 14, 2012 6:25 pm

I can't find anything on the boat telling me the limits of how many people I can safely have aboard. can anyone tell me how to find out? It is a 38' Challenger salon Cruiser.
Dan Biby
38' Challenger "DreamOn"

Peter M Jardine
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Post by Peter M Jardine » Sat Jul 14, 2012 9:25 pm

I have a 36 foot Challenger express, I would say the high side is about 10. I like to be aware of where everybody is, and keep visibility open at all times. The other issue is center of gravity, and whether fuel tanks are full or empty.. In protected waters perhaps a few more, but it would make me nervous. There was a recent accident in Rhode Island with a Silverton 34 that a few people died... the boat capsized with 20 some people aboard...

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debiby
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Post by debiby » Sat Jul 14, 2012 9:47 pm

Ya I heard about that, they had 27 on it that is what got me wondering. I have a 25' Carver Flybridge cruiser that has a plate in it that says 14 is the max for it but it is only a 8' beam and 13 feet shorter. I heard somewhere that 14 is the norm for max number of people but can't remember where I heard it. Usually if we all go out there are about 12 of us counting kids.
Dan Biby
38' Challenger "DreamOn"

boat_art
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Post by boat_art » Sat Jul 14, 2012 11:30 pm

As a former Coast Guard lifeboat station crewman my first reaction is: How many lifejackets do you have on board?
More importantly tho, I always consider the ages and limits of the passengers. In other words, how many would need help if the worst case happens, how many are available to help others, how many are drinking and how much, among other issues. I will never take more children than adults in any case. Keep in mind that you are responsible for every passenger on board.
Newer boats have the number of passengers listed but that is based on weight of an average person. Four infirm passengers overload a 4 passenger boat in my mind.
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1956 CC Connie 47'
1959 Caulkins bartender
1965 Cheoy Lee Frisco Flyer
1953 Chris Craft Holiday
1941 Chris Craft Deluxe
Plus 8-12 customer boats at any time
God don't count the days spent messing around in wood boats.

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debiby
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Post by debiby » Sat Jul 14, 2012 11:56 pm

I always have a bunch of life jackets and any child in my boat MUST wear a life jacket. Usually there are 3 or 4 young children and by that I mean under 10 but over 4 I try to avoid taking kids younger than that out but do once in a while. NEVER drink while cruising only when anchored for the night or docked and usually only a beer or 2, drinking days are long gone. I am planning on having a little party on the boat once we get her in and soaked up but that will be all adults but maybe 15 or 16 and you know they will all want to go for a ride so I want to make sure I would be ok with that many people.
Dan Biby
38' Challenger "DreamOn"

Rugger8
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Post by Rugger8 » Sun Jul 15, 2012 7:52 am

Dan,

I have a 46' DCFB model and I just had 14 on my boat, 6 were kids. And the boat handled fine but did ride low in the water especially with full tanks. Since she was just launched and for the first time had that much incremental weight there was more leakage as well. So be prepared for that. IMO, you are pretty close to the limit on a 38' boat. Can you do 2 trips? Probably easier and safer that way.

Jeff

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Post by boat_art » Sun Jul 15, 2012 7:52 am

Debiby...sounds like you needn't worry about the number of people. The limit on numbers is not a law as much as a way to limit weight, like I said. The weight limits were determined by the amount of "flotation" that the boat has (in other words if the boat capsizes how long it would stay afloat). So many other things come into play here such as weather, sea conditions, etc.
If more people were as conscientious as you are we would all be better off!
I believe that anyone with a classic boat is, by nature, a better captain.
http://www.boatartgallery.com
1956 CC Connie 47'
1959 Caulkins bartender
1965 Cheoy Lee Frisco Flyer
1953 Chris Craft Holiday
1941 Chris Craft Deluxe
Plus 8-12 customer boats at any time
God don't count the days spent messing around in wood boats.

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debiby
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Post by debiby » Sun Jul 15, 2012 9:47 am

I intend to go from the ramp to the slip which isn't more than a quarter mile probably a lot less untill she is good and soaked. I live in Colorado so no seas just a lake to put her on. Our lake is around a mile or so wide and maybe six or seven miles long so no big long cruises and anywhere we are we could pretty easily swim to shore. I thought I would be ok just like to be sure.
Dan Biby
38' Challenger "DreamOn"

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mfine
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Post by mfine » Sun Jul 15, 2012 11:35 am

The issue I see is not the number of people. I would recomend you launch her and make the first few shakedown cruises with no passengers at all, just you and people capable of being crew. You can bet there will be problems, and most are easier to handle without guests in the way.

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Doug P
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Post by Doug P » Sun Jul 15, 2012 4:34 pm

First, a little tongue in cheek.
My personal preferences-
6 for cocktails
4 for dinner
2 overnight

Seriously,
overloading and probably all on one side to see the fireworks, but also the water conditions....many boats were leaving after the fireworks and probably cocktails, throttles were rammed forward and turbulence occured and navigating around all those leaving boats was hazardous. Booze and boats do not mix. If you can recreate the sight in your mind, boats rushing about, in the dark. turbulent water. MORE people could have been lost.

I have found the roughest water in Puget Sound, because of loss of rudder control at low speed is the Montlake Cut by the U.

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BrokenRule2
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Post by BrokenRule2 » Thu Jul 19, 2012 3:18 pm


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