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Gaps On The Bottom

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Stovebolt
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Gaps On The Bottom

Post by Stovebolt » Wed Dec 23, 2009 7:57 pm

I just got my boat delivered to me from Maryland, and I noticed that, aside from going through hell on the back of a trailer for 3500 miles or whatever it was, and there being road dirt and what looks like road salt on the bottom, there are gaps between the planks on the bottom. Is this normal? If it isn't, please be gentle, HAHA. :shock:

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So is it as bad as I think? Or should I put er in water and see what happens?

Any input would be groovy, thanks.
1961 Chris Craft 17' Ski Boat
1973 15.6' Hourston Glasscraft

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steve bunda
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boat bottom

Post by steve bunda » Wed Dec 23, 2009 8:07 pm

Hi Stove bolt, Boat is dried out, put a garden hose in it , add water to bildge, but be carefull not to overfill and bust out the sides, sit down with a beer and watch it leek. It will swell up and slow the leaking, report back on how many beers it takes. steve

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Back to Bottoms 101

Post by Al Benton » Wed Dec 23, 2009 11:32 pm

We have a 50's vintage wood boat with double planked bottom (solid mahogany outer planks over plywood inner) and it is solid. The wood is dry so there are gaps between the outer planks. The bottom has been sanded and is ready to paint. The owner would like to put 2 coats of CPES, 4 coats of InterProtect 2000E and 2 coats of Pettit #1959.

Is this finish method recommended for a traditional bottom that needs to soak and swell in order to be watertight?

Al

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Post by WoodenRookie » Thu Dec 24, 2009 9:17 am

If Interlux 2000E is a barrier to help reduce planking from absorbing water thus expanding & contracting, then does a 10 year boat out of the water need to swell before an application of Interlux & paint? And if so how long after is the moisture level in the bottom planks suitable to apply Interlux.
1959 18' Continental "Knot Yet"
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steve bunda
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plank gaps

Post by steve bunda » Thu Dec 24, 2009 10:07 am

Bottom plank gaps,swelling,leaking and finishing,I have a few boats with unrestored original bottoms and try my best to keep them swelled up all the time.I think that seasonal temps and humidity changes will wear a boat out over a period of time with the plank movement.When finishing a bottom it is only common sense to do it when the boat is swelled up, pretty much the same for top side varnishing.Sanding and treating an old bottom with CPES and primers can't hurt,but it is only a temporary fix. An old bottom is a little more work to maintain than a new one,sometimes you can put a humidifier in the boat to help out during dry weather. Picture is off a Chris Craft that had 1/4 gaps between the planks, some one caulked the plank gaps to slow down the water . steve
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Gaps in bottom

Post by Wilson Wright » Thu Dec 24, 2009 11:15 am

I wouldn't fill that boat with water...Boats were designed to keep water out, not in...Knew a fellow who once put a hose in a boat and ran to answer the phone. He forgot the water hose and when he got back the planks had exploded off.

Better way, unless you want to start refinishing right away is to put a sprinkler underneath the trailer and let the hose, (if it isn't freezing weather where you are--- and if it is you sure don't want it to ice up inside the boat) run for a day or two and see if that won't soak the boat up enuff. At least you won't pull any boards off that way.
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Al Benton
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Post by Al Benton » Thu Dec 24, 2009 12:58 pm

Thanks, Steve,

If I understand this correctly, before applying sealers to the old bottom wood (CPES, Barrier Coats, hard paint) first add moisture content to tighten the gaps. Then, after sealing the old wood, keep the moisture level high enough to keep the wood from drying out by storing her in high humidity.

This scenario isn't impossible but it is unlikely in most cases to keep the moisture content constant when storing the boat in the winter months after finishing an old bottom this way. So, my questions are, is this finish still recommended if it's likely that she will dry out again, eventually? What happens to the planks that have been sealed on the outer surface if they do dry and shrink from the inside out. Will they survive this? Are they likely to cup (due to the hard outer surface)?

We know the ultimate answer, replace the bottom using the 5200 method and never soak again. But everyone else (probably 80% plus) that don't have the ultimate bottom are faced with these questions and I don't think there's a clear answer yet.

Al

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Post by Oberon01 » Thu Dec 24, 2009 4:00 pm

I thought I'd chime in on this topic, even though I have little direct knowledge. On my recently acquired '48 25' Sportsman, the original bottom is in excellant condition - so good it almost defies belief. After having three different restorers thoroughly examine it, the decision has been made to preserve the original planks. This is due in large part to my desire to preserve the boat as original, but also because the wood has no rot anywhere and is not deteriorated. The suggestion from all three guys was to thoroughly scrape the bottom and all the seams, fill them with Sika Flex (sp?) and finish the bottom as original from there on out. The bottom will also be re-fastened

I do not have the experience or knowledge to advise whether this appraoch would work for you. I think which method you choose also depends on the intended use. My boat will be fairly lightly used and stored in climate controlled surroundings when not on the lake. The argument is also that wood weakens with age, whether rot is present or not. I thnk if a boat was going to be heavily used, a longer-term solution might be better. Whether or not the owner is going for a preserved boat, rather than a restored boat, is also a consideration
1926 Mullins 16' Outboard Special
1940 CC 19'Custom
1946 Gar Wood 22' 6" Sedan
1946 16' Peterbrough Falcon
1947 CC 16' Special Runabout
1947 Chris Craft 22' Sportsman
1948 CC 25' Sportsman Sedan
1959 Feather Craft Islander Express Cruiser
1961 CC 21' Continental
1965 Glastron Futura 500 V -164
1965 CC Sea Skiff 24'

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steve bunda
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boat bottom

Post by steve bunda » Thu Dec 24, 2009 8:04 pm

Hi Wilson, you are correct , one must be carefull not to over fill the boat, this procedure is to be used as a test and not as regular seasonal swelling. Al, you are also correct,bottom line these wood boats with orignal bottoms should receive a new bottom and painting is not the answer to bottom leaking. But we have to start some where and realize that the bottom or foundation of the boat should be addressed before spending time and money on the topsides.Allow me to diverse a little, the boats were designed and delivered to the customer with a wet boat house or a boat house on the waters edge. This keeped the humidity levels at a comfortable level for the boats.Chris Crafts were never expected to last 10 years much less 40 or 50 years. Today we cannot expect boats with orignal bottoms to stay swelled up if we trailer them and store in our garage.My point is a new bottom is the best solution because of the age of the boats and the diffrent way we use,store and maintain them. steve

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Post by Oberon01 » Thu Dec 24, 2009 8:29 pm

One thing I forgot to mention was cost - at times it is just not feasible or possible for someone to put on a whole new bottom just to be able to use the boat, so some sort of compromise is required. In my case, on the joint recommenation of the three guys who checked mine over, I decided to go with keeping the bottom original. The reason was quite simple - if it does not work out, I can replace the bottom with a new 5200 at any time, so in my view, trying this remedial action out while keeping it original was worth the risk.

Cost may be a consideration, and indeed is much of the time, in many restorations. My boat, being a large sedan, would not be flipped to install the bottom, so the fact that the engine is already out was not a consideration. it would cost the same to do the bottom today as it would in a year or so, and that was another factor. If you are already stripping your boat out, then I would definetly consider a permanent replacement.

No matter what you choose, make sure it is safe and that if it is not, immediate and thorough corrective action is taken. Hopefully you can simply swell yours up and find that it provides acceptable performance. Steve is 100% right - we commonly ask for far more out of these boats than they were ever designed to give. Prepare for the worst and hope for the best.
1926 Mullins 16' Outboard Special
1940 CC 19'Custom
1946 Gar Wood 22' 6" Sedan
1946 16' Peterbrough Falcon
1947 CC 16' Special Runabout
1947 Chris Craft 22' Sportsman
1948 CC 25' Sportsman Sedan
1959 Feather Craft Islander Express Cruiser
1961 CC 21' Continental
1965 Glastron Futura 500 V -164
1965 CC Sea Skiff 24'

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Post by Al Benton » Fri Dec 25, 2009 3:16 pm

Paul, thanks much for your input. Your posts are most helpful. I'm thinking that the best way to re-finish the bottom paint on an old bottom may be to stick closely with the original method of using a couple of coats of the hard copper/bronze but on CPES treated bare planks. The CPES should help restore the old wood, prevent rot and provide a primer. The Pettit #1959 would probably work best.

As Steve says, the bottom wood was never expected to last this long, it has lost its original characteristics years ago, the bedding compound is long gone and its simply not going to stay swelled unless you leave her in (or over) the water, and maybe not even then. To go to extremes in sealing the old wood with barrier coats seems pointless and may even lead to problems.

When the Bottom Ferry comes with the pot of gold, go for a new 5200 soakless one.

Al

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Post by NSJA » Fri Dec 25, 2009 4:19 pm

Oberon01,

I am no wooden boat expert, like Steve is, but I am an architect, so I know a bit about Sikaflex. Sika Corporation make several products called Sikaflex, so you might want to verify which product they are recommending (www.sikacorp.com). The product that I am familiar with is called Sikaflex Construction Sealant. It has a very high adhesion strength, in fact, I have seen new wood split when trying to remove it from fully-cured Sikaflex.

I would be concerned that as the wood on the boat's bottom tries to expand, the Sikaflex might tear the wood fibers and cause damage.

Something to consider...

Happy holidays to all!

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Post by Al Benton » Fri Dec 25, 2009 5:47 pm

Neil,

Of the Marine Products that Sikaflex lists, I can't see that any of them would be appropriate for use on a Chris-Craft bottom with gaps. All of them appear to cure to a rubber-like adhesive to some extent. If it's applied while the bottom is dry, then the product may not allow for enough expansion when they get wet. The products can be compressed to some degree but won't flow out if over compressed.

One product that has been mentioned before on Boat Buzz is Davis "Slick Seam". I hear that it will flow out of the way of expanding planks, thus, not causing damage. It's a wax based product that can penetrate into the wood and cause problems with paint staying put.

Al

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Post by NSJA » Fri Dec 25, 2009 6:29 pm

Hi Al,

Happy holidays to you and your family! The product that you list sounds like a better alternative to me, but again, I am no expert.

Neil

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Post by Oberon01 » Fri Dec 25, 2009 6:49 pm

I am not sure which specific Sikaflex product is being recommended, but at least one of the three restorers who looked at the bottom has used Sikaflex on numerous bottoms he has worked on for around 20 years, without ever having an adverse situation develop. I am not certain why this product is being recommended over 5200 but it is a question I will ask.

Cost is not an issue in my case - but my desire to keep the bottom original, or as close to it as possible, is. I mention cost here only because it can be a major obstacle to a person using his boat, and something like Sikaflex or a 5200 repair can be deployed to create a temporary solution to an intractable problem. I know that my choice is only temporary, and that I will have to eventually replace the bottom, but if I can avoid that and present the boat as a well functioning example of how it arrived from the factory for a few years, then I am willing to assume the risk.

Being new to old boats, I am highly dependant upon the advice and experience of others, and I meld this with my own personal objectives for the indidivdual boats we own. I try to be careful in getting multiple opinions, and in this case, two of the three restorers I enlisted to examine the boat have prepared multiple Tahoe winners over many years, so I am confident in the qualifications of those who are advising me.

For the sake of clarity and to prevent me from possibly mis-representing what is being done, I will obtain the details of the proposed remedial work and post same, so that the extent of what is being done is clear.
1926 Mullins 16' Outboard Special
1940 CC 19'Custom
1946 Gar Wood 22' 6" Sedan
1946 16' Peterbrough Falcon
1947 CC 16' Special Runabout
1947 Chris Craft 22' Sportsman
1948 CC 25' Sportsman Sedan
1959 Feather Craft Islander Express Cruiser
1961 CC 21' Continental
1965 Glastron Futura 500 V -164
1965 CC Sea Skiff 24'

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steve bunda
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bottom caulking

Post by steve bunda » Fri Dec 25, 2009 6:50 pm

Hi to all interested and thanks for the nice complements. People caulk the bottom seams for a number of reasons all to stop the leakage,1.to save money. 2. sell the boat.3 to use the boat another summer. After 40 plus new 5200 bottoms and many more surveyed boats I can say that all the boats that were caulked resulted in structural damage after the boats swelled up. I have a boat in the shop now that was never caulked and has usable frames,also have a boat that had the chine planks and first bottom plank reset with 5200 in a repair with the bottom caulked and needs many frames replaced. Al, mentions the slick seam,I just bought a can to look at and I think it would work ,but you would have to do it every season if your boat drys out again. I can't tell you how many boats I have seen where the time and money has been spent on the topsides with little regard to the bottom. I think the bottom should be addresed first as it is the foundation of the boat and a safty issue to boot. Every one that has a new boat bottom loves them,no more soaking,no more cringing when you approach a big wave,no more bilge pump and battery worrys,fun safe rides with the family and friends.You would not restore a classic car on a rusty weak frame,I think these boats deserve the same treatment.They are very very special and have taken care of us so lets take care of them for the future generations. steve and laurie Merry Christmas!

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Post by Al Benton » Fri Dec 25, 2009 8:32 pm

Steve, Thank you very much for sharing your expert and professional advice with us. One of the best parts of participating here on Boat Buzz is that folks like you are so willing to share your time and knowledge as professionals in this hobby with the rest of us who are simply hobbyists looking for help. Thank you for being here with us and for us.

I am restoring a 1948 17' Deluxe. We started from the bottom up, actually from the bottom down, well, when she's up-side-down I suppose it would be from the top down, considering the bottom is now the top and up is down. On this boat we had no choice, the bottom wood was beyond hope. She has a new bottom.

WoodenRookie, who posted earlier on this thread asked me what I thought about using the 3-step process, i.e. CPES, Barrier, Hard Paint on his boat with original bottom wood. I have read other older posts here that seem to recommend it, just not certain they were referring to new and old bottoms. His boat is in the same shop as mine so I can attest the wood is solid. Still, it does need to swell. Thus, my questions that started this discussion.

Paul, the ACBS has several categories that old boats fall into. One of these is Preserved, another Restored. The society acknowledges Preserved as being boats with mostly original wood. One very big exception in this category is the bottom. A boat can have an entirely new 5200 bottom and still be considered Preserved if most of the boat's topsides and decks are still original wood. They recognize just what Steve Bunda is telling us. They encourage owners of old boats, Preserved or Restored, to keep them usable for their intended purpose, not to set on a trailer but to get out and enjoy them.

Al

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Post by Oberon01 » Fri Dec 25, 2009 9:29 pm

Hi Al, Steve, et al -

I perhaps should have clarified a couple of things. I am aware of the judging categories, but at this point I don't anticipate entering the '48 for judging. My intention is to preserve what the boating experience would have been like for a person in 1948, buying this boat new. This obviously places me in a very small category of enthusiast, and it is clearly not undertaken from a perspective of functionality. That can always be added later, with a 5200 or other no-soak bottom.

This boat is one of several that we have, not including modern boats, so it is not going to be heavily used, either. That said, it will be used - I will never own a trailer queen. Any time anything loses it's functionality, it loses it's appeal to me -boats included. Under these unique conditions, justification for retaining the original bottom is easily made. Once it no longer works or is too much trouble, it will be replaced.

I would never place myself in a position of advising this route for anyone, other than as a stop-gap measure, being undertaken for whatever reason. It is obvious that a no-soak bottom is the best choice for the huge majority of people and boats, and the option of repair or caulking of seams is truly only an appropriate consideration in a small minority of situations.
1926 Mullins 16' Outboard Special
1940 CC 19'Custom
1946 Gar Wood 22' 6" Sedan
1946 16' Peterbrough Falcon
1947 CC 16' Special Runabout
1947 Chris Craft 22' Sportsman
1948 CC 25' Sportsman Sedan
1959 Feather Craft Islander Express Cruiser
1961 CC 21' Continental
1965 Glastron Futura 500 V -164
1965 CC Sea Skiff 24'

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Post by Al Benton » Fri Dec 25, 2009 9:48 pm

Paul,

I completely understand. In reality I would venture to guess that most classics are still using original bottoms and that only a minority of them have new bottoms of some sort. It could be that no one knows the stats on this but I would be very surprised if it's the opposite.

Al

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steve bunda
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boat bottoms

Post by steve bunda » Sat Dec 26, 2009 10:07 am

Good morning all, Just to clariry my posts, all my comments are general and an over all view of wooden runabouts and utilities.None of my comments are intended to override or disagree with people that have seen boats in person and have surveyed. I just like to add more information to the discussion and provide other options.For example , a new 5200 or enhanced traditional boat bottom on a Chris Craft runabout will cost much more if it needs frame work replaced from damage due to bottom seam caulking.I have seen boats widened by 1 1/2 inches,the fasteners break,frames break,knees break,chines break,keels crack,water migrates and promotes rot.Sometimes it is just a few frame sections and other times it can be the whole bottom structure.On a rare boat one does not feel so bad when the bad news comes,but on most other everyday boats the owner has to love the boat and keep it in order to feel good about spending the money. In addition to replacment or repair of frames and planks on a boat , one can make an argument on either side, repair vs replace. This is why us restorers love gray boats,nothing is hidden ,everything needs work ,and finding nice wood is a bonus.We dislike Mop and Glow boats every time we take something apart we find old repairs,the more we take apart the more we find and pretty soon the good looking boat on the surface turns into a larger project than anticipated.Survivor boats are around,most often on old estates and in old boat houses, I take care of a few and own a few.Pictured a nice Chris Craft Model 100 , this is one with an orignal bottom that i would like to keep. I am thinking about the slick seam treatment or an enhanced traditional bottom,but will keep it in a boat house with proper humidity levels. Thanks for alowing me to rant, going back to work,you may call me if you have questions, steve
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Gaps on the bottom

Post by Dick Baner » Sat Dec 26, 2009 10:09 am

Its kinda late on this thread but I still want to put in a plug for using CPES anytime you get a chance at bare wood. When I first got my sea skiff about 10 years ago and was my original wood boat effort the hull was already upside down. After talking to a lot of folks I steered clear of a "west bottom" and stripped all the hull paint off. Then with a slotting blade cut out as much of the joint thiokol original caulk at the laps. Then filleted the laps with 5200 using a popcyle stick for the radius. Then 4 or more soaking coats of CPES to the bare wood up to the gunwales. Then nonablative Pettit hard racing bronze, three coats below the boot stripe. After having the boat in the water for a year with continued leaks at the laps I installed hundreds of stainless machine bolts at every lap at each rib I could get access to. As Al knows my boat spent most of its life thereafter on a trailer and I had minimal problem with gaps opening even though the very bottom of a skiff is plywood with no laps. These day anytime I have bare wood to work with on any boat it first gets at least two soaks with CPES. All finishes seem to bond to it better than with bare wood.
1967 33' Chris Craft SeaStrake
"Wave Toucher III,
1965 18' Carver Captain I/O "Wave Toucher II
1974 12' Alcort Minifish,
1973 15' Chrysler Mutineer "Wind Toucher"

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Post by Matt Smith » Sat Dec 26, 2009 11:00 am

Sorry for the late arrival... Stovebolt... You are OK... For now.. Enjoy your seams. Wilson is Wright... Hey there's a T shirt idea.. Anyway use the sprinkler. Then toss the sucker in the water. It will sink on the trailer by the way if you back it in. Make sure the bilge is good. I floated mine on some straps until the bilge could keep up. about 4 hrs.. And never had the problem again as long as the boat was wet. You will want a 5200 bottom in about a year. Start shopping now..
1948 25' Chris Craft Sportsman
1937 16' Special Racer
1968 40' Rice Trawler
1968 11' Crab Skiff
2018 Hole in my head

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Post by WoodenRookie » Sat Dec 26, 2009 11:43 am

thanks Al for keeping this moving. It's an interesting discussion but if I read through the lines correctly it looks like the 2000E Banner coats may be out :( for me. NO one stepped up and said it was a good fit. How true that we can't use a magic wand and wave it over each and every project. What I do know is this, we have a whole lot of history on many methods both good & bad (caulk, fiberglass, West system, 5200, and many variations of each. I can also find experienced restorers who will each have various opinions about all the above bottom options both good and bad. We have a wealth of work product on here and it is my hope that people will chime in on success stories other than the the easy answer (of a new 5200 Bottom). Here is what I believe, there are many boats out there running many variations of the above. Most won't comment on here about their success or failures but I wish they would. My 58/59 has the plywood inner-ply and a very solid original bottom. It has been out of the water for at least 15 years but the bottom is in great original shape. For now I am leaving as original, so back to the question. Anyone want to offer an idea from past experience on my bottom. I do believe technology has advanced a whole lot in the caulk area and waving a blanket wand over it as wood cupping/frame breaking might have been accurate 20 years ago but not today. I have seen 3 year old soft pliable caulk on big boat bottoms that many a person would struggle to convince their owners to use anything else. But when we move to trailable runabouts we move into the mind set of no caulk because it used to get hard/rubberized and cup planks. I've seen "Lifecaulk" soft for years now but most think caulk is taboo because of the way it was 25 years ago. But I wasn't planning on using any caulk but wasnt ruling out listening to a success story either. My thoughts are there are new good products out there but nobody has been willing to try or step up in this forum. I appreciate your feedback and ideas but don't buy into what normally is $500/foot is the only answer . In the 60's everyone said fiberglass the bottoms was the best answer.

thanks
Bill
1959 18' Continental "Knot Yet"
2013 Cobalt 200WSS
1977 Lakescraft Pontoon

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enhanced bottom

Post by doubleboater » Sat Dec 26, 2009 11:47 am

can someone explain an enhanced bottom. i asked before but no one replied. i also will be seriously considering in the sprummer. would to know the other alteranatives

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Post by Oberon01 » Sat Dec 26, 2009 1:24 pm

I can add a bit concerning "success" stories using bottoms other than 5200, etc. My 1940 BB has a fiberglass bottom, which I am advised encapsulates the original planks and frames. This was installed in the early to mid-1980's by Sierra Boat. The boat was an original Tahoe boat, if this makes any difference. Well, here is it the end of 2009 and the bottom is still fine. I have only ever seen the bilge pump come on once, and that was due to rain water. The bottom does not leak and as far as I know, the original bottom planks and frames are good. I am going to have it survyed this summer to be sure, but even if it is less than perfect, it has lasted 25 years. This boat has been used quite heavily for most of those years. I know that glass is quite frowned upon, but in this case there is little to complain about after so many years.


My '46 Gar sedan has the same sort of bottom, but I do not know when it was installed. This boat is undergoing a complete restoration, from the chines up. The reason the botom is not being done is that is 100% sound - two exhaustive surveys have confirmed this. So, while the rest of the boat rotted in the Florida humidity and salt air, for some reason the bottom stayed fine. It is the only thing I don't have to replace on the whole boat.
1926 Mullins 16' Outboard Special
1940 CC 19'Custom
1946 Gar Wood 22' 6" Sedan
1946 16' Peterbrough Falcon
1947 CC 16' Special Runabout
1947 Chris Craft 22' Sportsman
1948 CC 25' Sportsman Sedan
1959 Feather Craft Islander Express Cruiser
1961 CC 21' Continental
1965 Glastron Futura 500 V -164
1965 CC Sea Skiff 24'

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Post by MikeM » Sat Dec 26, 2009 1:50 pm

This is a great thread. Thanks to everyone who has contributed.

I feel like a flip-flopper on this issue because I can't seem to decide. While I agree that a new 5200 bottom is the first choice, I have seen many variations used successfully, and safely, over the years. The Sikaflex method discussed earlier seems to be a viable approach with a good track record.

My only other comment was that I heard or read somewhere a while back that in place of "slick seam" one can use a wax toilet gasket in the seams. Of course, this is a temporary fix if the boat is not kept in the water, but I'll bet it's a lot cheaper than any product you have to get from a marine supply store!!

Merry Christmas and keep the ideas coming!
1929 Hacker Craft Dolphin, 24'
1940 Century Utility, 17'
1947 Chris Craft Special, 16'
1947 Chris Craft Sportsman, 22'
1949 Chris Craft Racing Runabout, 19'
1952 Penn Yan Cartopper, 12'
1954 Chris~Craft Racing Runabout, 19' (For Sale)
1971 Century Arabian, 19'
1973 Dan Arena Custom, 21'

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Post by Al Benton » Sat Dec 26, 2009 2:38 pm

Matt, I missed your post earlier, "Wilson is Wright" would be a great tee-shirt idea.

All: I've heard of soaking the bottom from inside before, Craig Hartwig and Terry Fiest did it on Craig's '42 Deluxe when he first got it and it worked out. Just don't walk away (or have too many beers and fall asleep). The sprinkler is the safe way no doubt.

Matt, what paint did you put on the bottom of Sylvia? Did you use CPES? Barrier Coat? Hard Racing Bronze? All of the above? None of the above? She's been swelling and drying for a couple of years now and is still going strong so it may help to know what's on there.

Dick, I'm glad that I got to see Wave Runner before you parted with her, she's a great Sea Skiff and hopefully her new owners will treat her as well as you did. The CPES is a remarkable product, even on plywood as with your Sea Skiff. It soaks deep into solid wood but probably only the first layer of plywood except at the edges. It's a great primer coat, reconditions old wood and prevents rot.

In the summer of '05 I tinkered with the stuff, I've posted results before but this fall I remembered throwing these two pieces of mahogany out by the shed in the back yard back then. Each was about 9" long pieces 6" wide cut from the same board. I sanded and soaked one with CPES and left the other piece with the old stain and varnish. They were buried in mostly wet leaves, branches and twigs for 4 years when we found them, the CPES soaked piece is solid, the other fell apart when I tried to salvage it. It's good stuff.

Al

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rdapron
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Post by rdapron » Sat Dec 26, 2009 5:32 pm

Soaking a boat from the inside is fine as long as you take some precautions to prevent overfilling. Years ago when a boat of mine had an original bottom I would unscrew the garboard plug (the plug has pipe threads) and from the inside of the boat screw in a 6” long threaded pipe. These pipes are readily available at any hardware store in a variety of lengths. Once done, the water in the bilge would only rise 6” before it started to spill out the garboard drain. If you desire more or less water in the bilge just temporarily screw in a different length pipe and run the hose.
That said, if you can afford a new bottom you will have no regrets or worries for that matter.
rob

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Post by THE RAZZ » Sun Dec 27, 2009 12:18 am

We've seen an old Tahoe boatworks storing runabouts (original bottoms) for decades. Usually, two weeks before the customer arrives, the boatworks puts this runabout on a gantry (2) suspending the runabout (in the water) at the dock (can't sink on the gantry).

H2O Pressure is outside pressing in. Boat auto bailer works during swelling (flooding). Boats dry out during the winter- for decades- but the runabouts work fine year in and year out apparently.

Of course, not everyone has a gantry. Maybe the boat sitting on trailer in (fresh) water would work. But finding a place to leave the boat (on trailer) for two weeks could be a problem.

5200 will solve two problems. No more soaking or spare change! Buying a new bottom will stimulate the boat building economy. Its good, more or less.
Jerry
1942 17' barrelback 71923
1987 21' CC Stinger

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bottoms

Post by doubleboater » Sun Dec 27, 2009 2:58 pm

soooo nobody can explain an enhanced bottom.

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