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Honey, have you finished fixing Elude yet? 1937 35' Cruiser

Framing, planking and fairing. Repair, or reconstruction. If it's hull related, you'll find it here.

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robertpaul
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Re: Honey, have you finished fixing Elude yet? 1937 35' Cruiser

Post by robertpaul » Thu Nov 29, 2018 1:28 pm

On page 6 of this thread, I repaired the corners of the windshield frames and prepared them for re-assembly. Over the last couple of days I have finally put them together and it seems that it worked out ok. I had a can of Pettit Seam Compound that I acquired around 1992, and it worked great as bedding for the glass in the frame. When I popped the lid, it filled the room with the aroma of boat materials of the past. It was perfect. So here are the pics of the process and a toast to never throwing good stuff out.
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1937 35' Double Stateroom Enclosed Cruiser

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robertpaul
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Re: Honey, have you finished fixing Elude yet? 1937 35' Cruiser

Post by robertpaul » Sun Dec 02, 2018 10:50 am

Now that both windshields are assembled, all that remains is to clean them up and re-finish. However, I wanted to check to make sure that the two are at least close to being identical before I do anymore. I will test fit them on the boat (which is 400kms away) but for now I just positioned them face to face (as they are not square) to see how close I came to matching them. So either they both fit, or they both don't!
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1937 35' Double Stateroom Enclosed Cruiser

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robertpaul
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Re: Honey, have you finished fixing Elude yet? 1937 35' Cruiser

Post by robertpaul » Sun Dec 09, 2018 8:49 pm

Now that the windshields are done, I have turned my attention to repairing transom planks. The transom consists of five planks, almost 9' long for the top one, and just over 8' at the bottom. They are 3/4" thick and over 10" wide. Of the five, the second and third from the top are originals, and possibly the top one as well. I won't know that until I pull some fasteners. At this time I have the third plank at home and it is in very fine condition except for the ends where it was fastened to the cheeks. The cheeks themselves are ok (white oak), as the rot really got into the mahogany. The following pictures show the details and what I am dealing with. Fortunately the deterioration is limited to the very ends of the plank. My plan at this point is to cut off the offending end and then scarf in new material. I would like to recycle some of the excellent mahogany I have from the original bottom planks but this would require laminating and planing for thickness, and scarfing two pieces side by side to obtain the width. Not difficult but it will leave a visible line lengthwise. The vertical seam is unavoidable no matter what I do. Using the original material means that the grain will be identical, as well as hardness. Other than DRM, I am not sure I can come up with material similar enough to the original to blend nicely. I am very open to suggestions. You will see from the pictures why this plank is going back to where it was. I really like using the originals where I can.
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1937 35' Double Stateroom Enclosed Cruiser

joanroy
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Re: Honey, have you finished fixing Elude yet? 1937 35' Cruiser

Post by joanroy » Mon Dec 10, 2018 8:22 am

I replaced the bottom third of my transom. The top section was repaired prior to my ownership. What they did was cut back the plank ends to the first frame, repaired the corner frames, and fitted vertical mahogany dutchmen the same length and width on both sides. Sanded in, stained and varnished, it looks great. Yes, you can tell it’s a repair, but a really nicely done repair. It was a way to save most of the original plank and not have to go through the trouble of removing, bending and fitting new. The dutchmen are probably about six inches wide and eighteen inches or so long and well above the water line. There’s nothing wrong with a well fitted and fastened repair.

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robertpaul
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Re: Honey, have you finished fixing Elude yet? 1937 35' Cruiser

Post by robertpaul » Tue Dec 11, 2018 1:27 pm

I went to my stash of original bottom planks and quickly found one that looked to be a likely candidate for re-use. None of the bottom planks are as wide nor as thick as the transom planks so I will have do some laminating. However, I cut a length of the best part (about 6') and trimmed off a few inches from the end to get rid of the butt block fastener holes. I passed it through the planer a bunch of times, taking off only a minimum amount each time. It is cold and the rollers on the planer won't grip well enough to move the plank through if I try to take off too much at one pass. The material is a hard as nails. Here are a few more pics.
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1937 35' Double Stateroom Enclosed Cruiser

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